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Certificate Programs for Machine Maintenance

Bellingham Technical College

Machine Maintenance Certificate - Bellingham, WA
Certificate / 44 Credits
Jason Kefover - 360-752-8568 - JKefover@btc.ctc.edu
Ending: 03/27/14 (Capacity = 20)

Program Description

Bellingham Technical College’s Electro Mechanical Technology program places graduates in solid careers as industrial electricians, millwrights or instrument technicians. Demand for skilled workers is strong in high-growth industries such as refining, water treatment, petrochemical, pharmaceutical, and power generation.

Machine Maintenance graduates possess a broad range of highly-sought skills and knowledge. BTC’s program teaches students to troubleshoot, maintain, repair, and analyze sophisticated equipment in advanced manufacturing operations.
 

Program Skill Sets

  1. Design, analyze, and diagnose basic electrical systems through the application of electrical theory fundamentals.
  2. Design, analyze, and diagnose basic industrial mechanical systems through the application of hydraulic, pneumatic, lever and pulley theory fundamentals.
  3. Ensure safe work practices and installations through compliance with federal, state, and local regulations and industry standards including the National Electrical Code, WAC Chapter 296 and related RCW.
  4. Use proper tools and test equipment to construct and maintain power, lighting, signaling, and control systems in industrial settings.
  5. Use proper tools and test equipment to construct and maintain mechanical systems in industrial settings.

 

Clark College

Machining Technician CP - Vancouver, WA
Certificate of Proficiency / 107 Credits
Bruce Wells - 360-992-2548 - bwells@clark.edu
Ending: 03/21/14, 06/19/14 (Capacity = 50)

Program Description

Clark College's Machining Technology program offers instruction in numerous machine processes including the set-up and operation of the engine lathe, surface grinders, vertical mill, CNC lathes, EDM and CNC milling machines. All shop theory subjects have a direct bearing on the student's skill, safety, and attitude. In addition to shop theory and practice, the student studies math, blueprint reading, metallurgy, safety, and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) programming. MasterCAM programming classes teach basic CAM programming for mills, lathe, EDM, etc. The basic CNC class involves writing programs and learning to safely operate the HAAS CNC mills.

Program Skill Sets

  1. Demonstrate compliance of all machine shop safety regulations.
  2. Interpret blueprints and perform inspection of machined parts.
  3. Perform entry-level skills for setup and operation of manual machines.
  4. Perform entry-level skills to program, operate, and set up CNC machine tools.
  5. Communicate and interact in a team/group environment to perform multiple tasks in a professional and ethical manner.

Clark College

Manual Machining CP - Vancouver, WA
Certificate of Proficiency / 58 Credits
Bruce Wells - 360-992-2548 - bwells@clark.edu
Ending: 3/21/14, 6/19/14 (Capacity = 50)

Program Description

Clark College's Machining Technology program offers instruction in numerous machine processes including the set-up and operation of the engine lathe, surface grinders, vertical mill, CNC lathes, EDM and CNC milling machines. All shop theory subjects have a direct bearing on the student's skill, safety, and attitude. In addition to shop theory and practice, the student studies math, blueprint reading, metallurgy, safety, and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) programming. MasterCAM programming classes teach basic CAM programming for mills, lathe, EDM, etc. The basic CNC class involves writing programs and learning to safely operate the HAAS CNC mills.

Program Skill Sets

  1. Demonstrate compliance of all machine shop safety regulations.
  2. Interpret blueprints and perform inspection of machined parts.
  3. Perform entry-level skills for setup and operation of manual machines.
  4. Perform entry-level skills to program, operate, and set up CNC machine tools.
  5. Communicate and interact in a team/group environment to perform multiple tasks in a professional and ethical manner.

Green River Community College

Machine Maintenance - Auburn, WA
Short Term Certificate / 26 Credits
Josh Clearman - 253-288-3325 - jclearman@greenriver.edu
Ending: 08/14/14 (Capacity = 18)

Program Description

This in-depth course is designed to prepare the entry level machine maintenance technician with the knowledge and skills necessary to maintain, diagnose, and repair elementary hydraulic, pneumatic, and electrical systems and covers industry and workplace safety awareness and practices. Students are introduced to the mechanical concepts necessary for the installation, operation, and maintenance of industrial machinery. They acquire the skills to design and interpret industrial prints and component schematics. The course also covers techniques of assembling, rigging, and installing mechanical equipment. Students learn to work with mechanical transmission devices, including procedures for installation, removal, and maintenance and have an understanding of preventive, predictive, corrective, and reliability-centered maintenance. Students study the development of a comprehensive maintenance program and how to use a computerized maintenance management system.

Program Skill Sets

  1. Apply basic physical and mechanical principles to machinery operations and repairs.
  2. Recognize, interpret, and apply engineering graphic symbols, drawing conventions, and features to assist in the design, analysis, fabrication, installation and repair of industrial systems.
  3. Ensure safe work practices.
  4. Safely utilize basic machine shop hand and power tools and equipment to fabricate elementary parts.
  5. Basic electrical principles, measurements and system components. Basic rigging principles, components and practices.
  6. Common pumps, machinery, lubrications.
  7. Basic industrial shop manual, power and measurement hand tools and basic industrial shop bench and power equipment (lathes, drill presses, saws, grinders, etc.)
  8. Fundamental understanding of hydraulic and pneumatic system components, recognize, diagnose failures in elementary systems, and interpret the meaning of primary hydraulic and pneumatic schematic symbols; assemble, test, and troubleshoot various basic hydraulic circuits.

 

Lake Washington Institute of Technology

Machine Maintenance Technology - Kirkland, WA
Certificate of Completion / 42 Credits
Dana Jacallen - 425-739-8342 - dana.jacallen@lwtech.edu
Ending: 03/26/14, 06/25/14, 08/29/14, 12/04/14, 03/18/15 (Capacity = 24)

Program Description

This program is an introduction to understanding the variety and nature of the complex relationships between a large structure, its tenants, and the machinery that supports the building or the manufacturing process. Included are basic principles of Preventive Maintenance, HVAC, Refrigeration, Boilers, Electricity and Wiring, Power Generation & Distribution, Building Automation and Controls and Critical Support Equipment. Requirements needed for the safe, cost effective, ecological and ergonomic mechanical support for a commercial building or manufacturing process are also taught. Students will receive instruction on applicable local, State, and Federal Codes, sustainable energy practices; with an emphasis on being prepared to continue to pursue lifelong learning opportunities in the mechanical and building engineering fields.

Program Skill Sets

  1. Apply basic physical and mechanical principles to machinery operations and repairs.
  2. Recognize, interpret, and apply engineering graphic symbols, drawing conventions, and features to assist in the design, analysis, fabrication, installation and repair of industrial systems.
  3. Ensure safe work practices.
  4. Safely utilize basic machine shop hand and power tools and equipment to fabricate elementary parts. Basic electrical principles, measurements and system components.
  5. Basic rigging principles, components and practices.
  6. Common pumps, machinery, lubrications.
  7. Basic industrial shop manual, power and measurement hand tools and basic industrial shop bench and power equipment (lathes, drill presses, saws, grinders, etc.)
  8. Fundamental understanding of hydraulic and pneumatic system components, recognize, diagnose failures in elementary systems, and interpret the meaning of primary hydraulic and pneumatic schematic symbols; assemble, test, and troubleshoot various basic hydraulic circuits.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology

Welding Technology CP - Kirkland, WA
Certificate of Proficiency / 75 Credits
Doug Rupik - 425-739-8347
Ending: 03/22/13, 06/20/13, 08/23/13, 12/12/13, 3/26/14, 6/25/14 (Capacity = 65)

Program Description

Welding Technology certificate students learn welding skills used in construction projects, manufacturing, industrial plants, and in maintenance industries. Using the latest welding processes and techniques, students learn to read blueprints and fabricate products in a variety of shapes and sizes. Students prepare to take the Washington Association of Building Officials (WABO) test.

Program Skill Sets

Welding Technology certificate graduates will:

  1. Be prepared for a range of entry-level positions as welder apprentices, welders, welder fabricators, welding fitters.
  2. Demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation , and technical and information literacy skills.

Olympic College

Mechanical Technology - Bremerton, WA
Short Term Certificate / 56 Credits
Ron Raty - 360-475-7389 - rraty@olympic.edu
Ending: 06/11/14

Program Description

None listed.

Program Skill Sets

1. Demonstrate an understanding of composite terminology with the ability to define, utilize, and explain composite terminology.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of safety rules for equipment in the composites laboratory.
3. Demonstrate an understanding laboratory experiments by composing detailed reports.
4. Demonstrate an understanding of composite builds by evaluating composites builds that you and or classmates have created.
5. Demonstrate an understanding of basic materials used for vacuum bagging by identification.
6. Demonstrate the ability to construct composite parts in group projects.
7. Demonstrate the ability to construct composite parts as individual projects.
8. Demonstrate an understanding of matrix materials: resins and fiber reinforcements.
9. Demonstrate an understanding of basic design considerations for composite structures.
10. Demonstrate an understanding storage and handling requirements of prepreg.
11. Demonstrate an understanding of unique properties of composite reinforcement fibers.
12. Demonstrate an understanding of cure profiles.
13. Demonstrate an understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of defined or built composite parts.
14. Demonstrate an understanding to select an individual project.
15. Demonstrate an understanding/ ability to schedule a project over a five week period-approximately 2hrs/day (total of 50 hours).
16. Demonstrate an understanding and ability to build project-NDI of part to determine quality.

Renton Technical College

Electrical Plant Maintenance - Renton, WA
Short Term Certificate / 29 Credits
Gay Kiesling - 425-235-7863 - gkiesling@rtc.edu
Ending: 12/14 (Capacity = 20)

Program Description

This program is designed for plant and machine maintenance trainees. Students learn AC and DC theory, related math, and various types of electrical equipment. Students learn troubleshooting skills to prepare them to diagnose and solve electrical problems in an industrial setting.

Program Skill Sets

None listed.

Degree Programs for Machine Maintenance

Bellingham Technical College

Electro Mechanical Technology AAS-T - Bellingham, WA
AAS-T / 122 Credits
Jason Kefover - 360-752-8568 - JKefover@btc.ctc.edu
Ending: 06/24/14 (Capacity = 20)

Program Description

The Electro Mechanical Technology (EMTEC) Program prepares students with the knowledge and skills required for success as industrial electricians, millwrights or instrument technicians. This Program builds a broad knowledge in various industrial processes including electricity, hydraulics, pneumatics, engineering graphics, welding, boilers, etc. Graduates will be able to troubleshoot, maintain, repair, and analyze sophisticated equipment in advanced manufacturing operations. Graduates are prepared  to work in a variety of advanced manufacturing operations—particularly petrochemical, refining, pharmaceuticals, chemical, value-added wood products, pulp and paper, power generation, utilities, and wastewater treatment facilities, as well as smaller facility maintenance.

Program Skill Sets

Successful Program graduates will:

  1. Design, analyze, and diagnose basic electrical systems through the application of electrical theory fundamentals.
  2. Design, analyze, and diagnose basic industrial mechanical systems through the application of hydraulic, pneumatic, lever and pulley theory fundamentals.
  3. Ensure safe work practices and installations through compliance with federal, state, and local regulations and industry standards including the National Electrical Code, WAC Chapter 296 and related RCW.
  4. Use proper tools and test equipment to construct and maintain power, lighting, signaling, and control systems in industrial settings.
  5. Use proper tools and test equipment to construct and maintain mechanical systems in industrial settings.
  6. Install new and modify existing process systems and components utilizing appropriate electrical and millwright/mechanical skills and materials.

Clark College

Machining Technologies AAS - Vancouver, WA
AAS / 122 Credits
Bruce Wells - 360-992-2548 - bwells@clark.edu
Ending: 03/22/13, 06/20/13, 8/30/13, 12/12/13, 3/21/14, 6/19/14 (Capacity = 50)

Program Description

Clark College's Machining Technology program offers instruction in numerous machine processes including the set-up and operation of the engine lathe, surface grinders, vertical mill, CNC lathes, EDM and CNC milling machines. All shop theory subjects have a direct bearing on the student's skill, safety, and attitude. In addition to shop theory and practice, the student studies math, blueprint reading, metallurgy, safety, and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) programming. MasterCAM programming classes teach basic CAM programming for mills, lathe, EDM, etc. The basic CNC class involves writing programs and learning to safely operate the HAAS CNC mills.

Program Skill Sets

  1. Demonstrate compliance of all machine shop safety regulations.
  2. Interpret blueprints and perform inspection of machined parts.
  3. Perform entry-level skills for setup and operation of manual machines.
  4. Perform entry-level skills to program, operate, and set up CNC machine tools.
  5. Communicate and interact in a team/group environment to perform multiple tasks in a professional and ethical manner.

Clark College

Machining Technologies AAT - Vancouver, WA
AAT / 118 Credits
Bruce Wells - 360-992-2548 - bwells@clark.edu
Ending: 3/21/14, 6/19/14 (Capacity = 50)

Program Description

Clark College's Machining Technology program offers instruction in numerous machine processes including the set-up and operation of the engine lathe, surface grinders, vertical mill, CNC lathes, EDM and CNC milling machines. All shop theory subjects have a direct bearing on the student's skill, safety, and attitude. In addition to shop theory and practice, the student studies math, blueprint reading, metallurgy, safety, and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) programming. MasterCAM programming classes teach basic CAM programming for mills, lathe, EDM, etc. The basic CNC class involves writing programs and learning to safely operate the HAAS CNC mills.

Program Skill Sets

  1. Demonstrate compliance of all machine shop safety regulations.
  2. Interpret blueprints and perform inspection of machined parts.
  3. Perform entry-level skills for setup and operation of manual machines.
  4. Perform entry-level skills to program, operate, and set up CNC machine tools.
  5. Communicate and interact in a team/group environment to perform multiple tasks in a professional and ethical manner.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology

Building/Plant Maintenance - Kirkland, WA
AAS / 116 Credits
Dana Jacallen - 425-739-8342 - dana.jacallen@lwtech.edu
Ending: 03/26/14, 06/25/14, 08/29/14, 12/04/14, 03/18/14 (Capacity = 24)

Program Description

Program Mission: The Building & Plant Maintenance Technology degree prepares students for entry level Preventive Maintenance Engineering positions, targeted toward multi-storied commercial office complexes and a wide variety of industrial manufacturing and food service equipment maintenance positions. This program is an introduction to understanding the variety and nature of the complex relationships between a large structure, its tenants, and the machinery that supports the building or the manufacturing process. Included are basic principles of Preventive Maintenance, HVAC, Refrigeration, Boilers, Electricity and Wiring, Power Generation & Distribution, Building Automation and Controls and Critical Support Equipment. Requirements needed for the safe, cost effective, ecological and ergonomic mechanical support for a commercial building or manufacturing process are also taught. Students will receive instruction on applicable local, State, and Federal Codes, sustainable energy practices; with an emphasis on being prepared to continue to pursue lifelong learning opportunities in the mechanical and building engineering fields.

Program Skill Sets

Building Plant Maintenance Technology AAS degree graduates will:
1. Be prepared for a wide range of entry level engineering positions in the building and plant maintenance field.

2. Demonstrate entry-level understanding of the basic principles of building mechanical and piping system operation & maintenance.

3. Operate and maintain a live boiler under supervision; be prepared for a DPD Grade V Boiler Fireman License exam, & be familiar with ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel CODE.

4. Operate refrigeration systems and their support equipment as part of preparation to sit for a DPD Refrigeration Operating Engineers License exam; properly transfer and handle refrigerant in preparation for EPA 608 certification.

5. Be introduced to the National Electrical Code standards, recommended practices & guides for commercial & industrial building electrical distribution.

6. Demonstrate entry-level skills in the operation, maintenance and repair of HVAC systems.

7. Demonstrate entry-level skills in electric motor and control systems application and maintenance.

8. Demonstrate entry-level skills in Building Automation & Control Network selection, installation, maintenance & protocol for Field Equipment PLC Controllers.

9. Demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills.

10. Meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology

Welding Technology AAS - Kirkland, WA
AAS / 95 Credits
Doug Rupik - 425-739-8347
Ending: 3/26/14, 6/25/14 (Capacity = 66)

Program Description

Program Mission:

The Welding Technology AAS degree provides students with skills to weld and fabricate complex projects. Students receive in-depth knowledge of the nature of metals as it relates to welding, fabricating, and the application of heat. Students also prepare to take the Washington Association of Building Officials (WABO) certification test. Students can pursue four different welding focuses in this program: Structural and Plate, Pipe, Aerospace and GTAW manufacturing, and Fabrication Welding.

Program Skill Sets

Welding Technology AAS degree graduates will:

1. Be prepared for a range of entry-level positions as welder apprentices, welders, welder fabricators, welding fitters.

2. Be prepared to succeed on the WABO certification and similar industry exams.

3. Demonstrate proficiency in most major industrial welding and cutting processes common in the construction, manufacturing, maintenance, shipbuilding, and/or aerospace industries

4. Demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, communication, intercultural appreciation, and technical and information literacy skills

5. Meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes.

Spokane Community College

Hydraulic and Pneumatic Aviation Technology - Spokane, WA
AAS / 120 Credits
John Norman - 509-533-7137
Ending: 06/30/2014

Program Description

Graduates from the Hydraulic and Pneumatic Automation Technology program have developed skills to qualify for employment in hydraulic and pneumatic sales, automated equipment fabrication or plant machinery maintenance work.

Program Skill Sets

1. A thorough knowledge of individual hydraulic and pneumatic components, the application and proper installation of each, preventative maintenance procedures and potential service problems.
2. Read and understand hydraulic and pneumatic schematics as they relate to machine operation.
3. Have hands-on experience in hydraulic systems fluid line layout and installation.
4. Read and interpret electrical schematics as they relate to machine sequence of operation.
5. Working knowledge of the use of electrical control to sequence solenoid valves and control machine functions.
6. Repair hydraulic and pneumatic components.
7. Lay out manifolds and understand the use and application of cartridge type valves in manifolds.
8. Understand complex automated machine operation using programmable controller and relay logic.
9. Troubleshoot automated machinery using electrical, pneumatic and hydraulic schematics.
10. Use computer for word processing and database for parts inventory control, invoicing and back ordering.
11. Use CAD programs for making schematic drawings and designing hydraulic manifolds.
12. Understand the uses of programmable controllers to sequence and monitor machine functions on automated equipment. 13. Install and maintain complex electronic controlled hydraulic equipment.
14. Write and troubleshoot PLC programs for precision machine operation.
15. Understand basic motion control.

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Washington's 34 community and technical colleges produce thousands of graduates per year. This tool allows those in aerospace and advanced manufacturing to search for graduates within a category (skills or job type), school or location. This shows employers how many skilled labor positions they can hire within certain skill sets. 

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