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Certificate Programs for Precision Machining

Bates Technical College

Manual Machining - Tacoma, WA
Certificate / 72 Credits
Lin Zhou - 253-680-7105
Ending: 8/14/14 (Anticipated Graduates = 45)

Program Description

Machinists produce precision parts, tools, and instruments utilizing both manual and computerized fabrication systems. Students prepare for apprenticeship with instruction that includes extensive hands-on experience in the use of traditional precision tooling and machining equipment, as well as sophisticated, state-of-the-art equipment including Haas lathes, the Visual Quick Code Probing System and CG Tech software. This is a pre-apprenticeship program for the Tacoma Machinists Joint Apprenticeship Training Committee. The program also provides extended learning opportunities for persons previously or currently employed in related professions.

Program Skill Sets

At the successful completion of the program curriculum, students will be able to:

  1. Apply safety procedures appropriate to running a modern machine shop.
  2. Interpret Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) used in machining fluids and materials.
  3. Use micrometers, indicators, calipers, height gauges, and etc. to measure and inspect parts accurately.
  4. Solve practical trigonometry problems related to the geometry of parts.
  5. Read and interpret engineering drawings as they apply to machined parts
  6. Use geometric dimensioning and tolerancing symbols as applied to Engineering drawings
  7. Identify and use appropriate tool materials for a given application.
  8. Apply speeds and feeds for various cutting tools and materials.
  9. Set up and operate a variety of manual lathes, milling machines, and precision grinding machines to produce parts to specifications.
  10. Use common CNC machine language to write programs for CNC lathes and mills.
  11. Set up and operate a variety of CNC lathes and milling machines using 2,3 and 4 axis movements to produce parts to specifications.

In addition, the following college-wide learning outcomes reflect the guiding expectations of all programs at Bates Technical College:

  • Human Diversity
  • Effective Communication
  • Critical-thinking
     

 

Bellingham Technical College

Quality Assurance Certificate - Bellingham, WA
Certificate / 32 Credits
Tim Martinson or Evan Walker - 360-752-8406 or 360-752-8787
Ending: 12/12/14 (Anticipated Graduates = 24)

Program Description

The Quality Assurance certificate prepares students for entry level employment opportunities as a quality inspector in the manufacturing industry.  The job of a quality inspector is to ensure that products are manufactured to meet the specifications, and expectations of the customer.  This certificate contains three quality specific courses which emphasize the basics of manufacturing, management philosophy, application of quality improvement through statistical documentation, and the uses of precision measurement tools.  The curriculum also contains classes which focus on computer, math, and interpersonal skills.  Currently opportunities for employment are growing in the aerospace industry along with other facets of manufacturing.

Program Skill Sets

Certificate graduates will apply their new skill set to ensure that a manufactured part complies with its blueprint specifications. The student will perform precision measurements utilizing various instruments and provide statistical documentation of specific parts. Also the student will provide feedback and make informed decisions in order to improve the manufacturing process.

Objectives:

  1. List the elements necessary for manufacturing to take place
  2. Match various types of manufacturing with the materials they commonly use and the equipment, methods and processes they employ
  3. Distinguish between quality control and process control
  4. Explain the importance of variation and waste
  5. Determine the standard deviation for a sample group
  6. Establish control limits for a process based on sampling data
  7. Decide if a pattern of defects on a control chart requires stopping production
  8. Describe a “normal curve” including its mathematical characteristics and importance to quality control
  9. Convert SI and US units and calculate derived units from basic units
  10. Identify the proper measuring tool for a given application
  11. Demonstrate appropriate use of measuring tools to determine an item’s conformance to specifications
  12. Use appropriate calibration and measurement documentation procedures
  13. Read a print or specification and determine the range of acceptable sizes for features specified

 

Clark College

Machining Technician CP - Vancouver, WA
Certificate of Proficiency / 107 Credits
Bruce Wells - 360-992-2548 - bwells@clark.edu
Ending: 12/05/14, 03/13/15, 06/12/15 (Anticipated Graduates = 6)

Program Description

Clark College's Machining Technology program offers instruction in numerous machine processes including the set-up and operation of the engine lathe, surface grinders, vertical mill, CNC lathes, EDM and CNC milling machines. All shop theory subjects have a direct bearing on the student's skill, safety, and attitude. In addition to shop theory and practice, the student studies math, blueprint reading, metallurgy, safety, and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) programming. MasterCAM programming classes teach basic CAM programming for mills, lathe, EDM, etc. The basic CNC class involves writing programs and learning to safely operate the HAAS CNC mills.

Program Skill Sets

  1. Demonstrate compliance of all machine shop safety regulations.
  2. Interpret blueprints and perform inspection of machined parts.
  3. Perform entry-level skills for setup and operation of manual machines.
  4. Perform entry-level skills to program, operate, and set up CNC machine tools.
  5. Communicate and interact in a team/group environment to perform multiple tasks in a professional and ethical manner.

Clark College

Manual Machining CP - Vancouver, WA
Certificate of Proficiency / 58 Credits
Bruce Wells - 360-992-2548 - bwells@clark.edu
Ending: 06/19/14, 12/05/14, 03/13/15, 06/12/15 (Anticipated Graduates = 6)

Program Description

Clark College's Machining Technology program offers instruction in numerous machine processes including the set-up and operation of the engine lathe, surface grinders, vertical mill, CNC lathes, EDM and CNC milling machines. All shop theory subjects have a direct bearing on the student's skill, safety, and attitude. In addition to shop theory and practice, the student studies math, blueprint reading, metallurgy, safety, and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) programming. MasterCAM programming classes teach basic CAM programming for mills, lathe, EDM, etc. The basic CNC class involves writing programs and learning to safely operate the HAAS CNC mills.

Program Skill Sets

  1. Demonstrate compliance of all machine shop safety regulations.
  2. Interpret blueprints and perform inspection of machined parts.
  3. Perform entry-level skills for setup and operation of manual machines.
  4. Perform entry-level skills to program, operate, and set up CNC machine tools.
  5. Communicate and interact in a team/group environment to perform multiple tasks in a professional and ethical manner.

Everett Community College

Machine Operator Certificate - Everett, WA
Short Term Certificate
Ray Kubista - 425-267-0162 - rkubista@everettcc.edu
Ending: 08/22/14 (Anticipated Graduates = 14)

Program Description

This course is designed to prepare participants to work in entry level positions as machine operators, including theory and hands-on experience with manual and CNC machines, machine tools, machinist application math, and precision measurement

Program Skill Sets

Participants who successfully complete the course will be able to perform the following with supervision (ranging from close to minimal):

1. Determine if own work is complete and correct as specified by instructions, drawings and specifications.
2. Drill, ream, hone, bore, lap and/or countersink straight and close tolerance holes.
3. Follow correct lifting and safety procedures.
4. Apply machine shop theory and procedures and regarding machinability of materials (e.g., cutting speed and feed rates for material being machined).
5. Use proper procedures for handling and disposal of hazardous materials per government regulations and industry practices.
6. Apply the coordinate system to identify multiple machine axes (e.g., X,Y,Z).
7. Operate computing equipment to access job information (e.g., drawings, specifications and other online information systems; upload/download programs.
8. Read and interpret engineering, machine and/or tooling drawings. Capable of visualizing a three-dimensional shape from a two-dimensional view, converting left-hand to right-hand views and understanding symbols, flag notes, general notes.
9. Set-up and operate milling machines. Includes knowing machine capabilities & limitations, controller operations, identifying and resolving problems such as unusual sounds or vibrations in the machinery, changes in offset values, and worn cutters/tool inserts.
10. Use mathematics, including practical math, algebra, geometry and trigonometry.
11. Use various types of hand tools and/or hand-held power tools.
12. Use various types of precision measuring tools.
13. Follow oral/written instructions provided by the lead, team leader, supervisor and/or engineering.

Everett Community College

Principles of Precision Machining Certificate - Everett, WA
Short Term Certificate / 40 Credits
Annette Floyd - 425-388-9562 - afloyd@everettcc.edu
Ending: 08/22/14, 12/13/14, 03/20/15, 06/13/15 (Anticipated Graduates = 20)

Program Description

This course covers conventional machining, basic blueprint reading and math; health and safety; and introduction to CNC machining. The course work is divided between lab assignments, lecture and reading/workbook assignments, with a significant amount of lab time dedicated to conventional mills and lathes. The course also covers advanced blueprint reading skills including understanding of Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerance, applied math skills, simple CNC Machine programming and operation, introduction to Lean manufacturing, and introduction to ISO9001/AS9100 quality systems.

Program Skill Sets

1. Safely produce a part with in print on a conventional lathe and on a conventional milling machine.
2. Accurately read precision measuring tools within .002”.
3. Read prints to industry’s standards and interpret manufacturing drawings and accurately determine tolerances on a blue print.
4. Visualize 3 dimensional shapes from two dimensional drawings using orthographic projection.
5. Write a basic G-code program to produce a tool path of a given shape.
6. Math used to solve typical machine shop problems using Algebra and Plane Geometry to: Accurately determine the upper and lower limits of dimension tolerances; Work though specific shop math formulas accurately; Visualize geometric shapes; Find specific Cartesian coordinates; solve typical machine shop problems using trigonometry.
7. Set up a CNC machine by: finding and storing in the controller the work absolute zero offsets.
8. Loading tools into the machine’s magazine.
9. Correctly establish tool offsets.
10. Change wear and diameter offsets to adjust part dimensions to meet print specifications.
11. Safely start up the machine and properly shut it down.
12. Make minor program edits at the machine to change speeds or feeds.
13. Determine the processes needed to create precision hole; Hone or lap a hole +/-.0005”; measure a bore diameter using a dial bore gage within .0002”.
14. Write a basic G-code program; Identify and define G-Codes and M-Codes.
15. Write a program that loads a tool and performs a machining operation.
16. Determine thread tolerances.
17. Determine the stack of gage blocks needed to set up a sine bar.
18. Find the distance between holes on a bolt circle involving an odd number of holes.
19. Find the lengths of the sides of a right triangle when only one side and one internal angle is known.
20. Can determine the internal angles of a right triangle when only the sides are known.
21. Basic principles of Lean/Six Sigma manufacturing principles.
22. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts of 5S, Cell Design and Pull Systems.
23. Basic principles the ISO 9001/AS9100 system and how a quality system is used in an organization.

Green River Community College

Principles of Precision Machining - Auburn, WA
Short Term Certificate / 26 Credits
Josh Clearman - 253-288-3325 - jclearman@greenriver.edu
Ending: 08/14/14 (Anticipated Graduates = 18)

Program Description

This course covers conventional machining, basic blueprint reading and math; health and safety; and introduction to CNC machining. The course work is divided between lab assignments, lecture and reading/workbook assignments, with a significant amount of lab time dedicated to conventional mills and lathes. The course also covers blueprint reading skills including a basic understanding of Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerance, applied math skills, basic CNC Machine programming and operation, introduction to Lean manufacturing.

Program Skill Sets

  1. Safely produce a part with in print on a conventional lathe and on a conventional milling machine.
  2. Accurately read precision measuring tools within .002”.
  3. Read prints to industry’s standards and interpret manufacturing drawings and accurately determine tolerances on a blue print.
  4. Visualize 3 dimensional shapes from two dimensional drawings using orthographic projection.
  5. Write a basic G-code program to produce a tool path of a given shape Math used to solve typical machine shop problems using Algebra and Plane Geometry to: Accurately determine the upper and lower limits of dimension tolerances; Work though specific shop math formulas accurately; Visualize geometric shapes; Find specific Cartesian coordinates; solve typical machine shop problems using trigonometry.
  6. Set up a CNC machine by: finding and storing in the controller the work absolute zero offsets; Loading tools into the machine’s magazine.
  7. Correctly establish tool offsets Change wear and diameter offsets to adjust part dimensions to meet print specifications.
  8. Safely start up the machine and properly shut it down.
  9. Make minor program edits at the machine to change speeds or feeds  
  10. Write a basic G-code program; Identify and define G-Codes and M-Codes. Write a program that loads a tool and performs a machining operation.
  11. Determine thread tolerances Determine the stack of gage blocks needed to set up a sine bar.
  12. Find the distance between holes on a bolt circle involving an odd number of holes.
  13. Find the lengths of the sides of a right triangle when only one side and one internal angle is known.
  14. Determine the internal angles of a right triangle when only the sides are known.
  15. Basic principles of Lean/Six Sigma manufacturing principles.
  16. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts of 5S, Cell Design and Pull Systems.

 

Lake Washington Institute of Technology

Machine Technology CP - Kirkland, WA
Certificate of Proficiency / 79 Credits
Mike Clifton - 425-739-8357
Ending: 08/29/14, 12/12/14, 03/23/15, 06/17/15 (Anticipated Graduates = 44)

Program Description

Machine Technology certificate students will be well positioned to begin a career in the machine trades by gaining basic machining competencies through their work on projects along with a thorough grounding in shop theory, applied math, and a special emphasis on CAD/CAM programming and CNC machining.

Program Skill Sets

Machine Technology certificate graduates will:

1. Be prepared with skills to perform entry-level CNC machining and manual machining.

2. Gain a thorough grounding in shop theory and applied math.

3. Perform CAD/CAM programming and manual programming.

4. Set up and operate machine tools with a minimum of supervision.

5. Demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, intercultural appreciation, communication and technical and information literacy skills.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology

Principles of Precision Machining - Kirkland, WA
Certificate of Proficiency / 47 Credits
Mike Clifton - 425-739-8357
Ending: 08/29/14, 12/12/14, 03/23/15, 06/17/15 (Anticipated Graduates = 42)

Program Description

Principles of Precision Machining certificate students will be well positioned to begin a career in the machine trades by gaining basic machining competencies through their work on projects along with a thorough grounding in shop theory, applied math, and a special emphasis on CAD/CAM programming and CNC machining.

Program Skill Sets

Precision Machining certificate graduates will be able to:

1. Safely produce a part with in print on a conventional lathe and on a conventional milling machine.

2. Accurately read precision measuring tools within .002”.

3. Read prints to industry’s standards and interpret manufacturing drawings and accurately determine tolerances on a blue print.

4. Visualize 3 dimensional shapes from two dimensional drawings using orthographic projection Write a basic G-code program to produce a tool path of a given shape.

5. Math used to solve typical machine shop problems using Algebra and Plane Geometry to: Accurately determine the upper and lower limits of dimension tolerances; Work though specific shop math formulas accurately; Visualize geometric shapes; Find specific Cartesian coordinates; solve typical machine shop problems using trigonometry.

6. Set up a CNC machine by:

  • finding and storing in the controller the work absolute zero offsets,
  • loading tools into the machine’s magazine,
  • correctly establish tool offsets,
  • change wear and diameter offsets to adjust part dimensions to meet print specifications,
  • safely start up the machine and properly shut it down,
  • make minor program edits at the machine to change speeds or feeds,
  • determine the processes needed to create precision hole; Hone or lap a hole +/-.0005”; measure a bore diameter using a dial bore gage within .0002”
  • write a basic G-code program; identify and define G-Codes and M-Codes,
  • write a program that loads a tool and performs a machining operation,
  • determine thread tolerances,
  • determine the stack of gage blocks needed to set up a sine bar,
  • find the distance between holes on a bolt circle involving an odd number of holes,
  • find the lengths of the sides of a right triangle when only one side and one internal angle is known,
  • can determine the internal angles of a right triangle when only the sides are known

7. Basic principles of Lean/Six Sigma manufacturing principles.

8. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts of 5S, Cell Design and Pull Systems.

9. Basic principles the ISO 9001/AS9100 system and how a quality system is used in an organization.

Olympic College

Manufacturing Technology Principles of Precision Machining - Bremerton, WA
Certificate / 39 Credits
Brian Petty - 360-473-0580 - bpetty@olympic.edu
Ending: 06/11/14, 06/19/15 (Anticipated Graduates = 15)

Program Description

This certificate is designed to provide students with entry-level manufacturing skills and a foundation to pursue other certificates and two-year degrees in any manufacturing or trade specialty areas. Computer Numerical Control (CNC) courses are included to provide additional high-demand skills to students completing this curriculum. Students will learn about hand tools, shop safety procedures, blueprints, machinery and Computer Numerical Control (CNC). A complete list of the courses included in the certificate can be found in the Olympic College catalog.

Program Skill Sets

Upon completion of this program, successful students will have demonstrated the ability to apply their skills and knowledge in the following ways:

  1.  Demonstrate an understanding of safety rules for equipment, personal protective equipment, interpret Material Data Safety Sheets (MSDS), and safety features of machines in a manufacturing laboratory.
  2. Prepare resources for production, develop an effective process plan, identify basic types of drawings, develop simple sketches of objects and read blueprints.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of computer numerical control (CNC) terminology with the ability to define, utilized and explain CNC terminology.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to perform programming calculations and handwrite numerical control codes, as well as program, trouble shoot, safely set-up and operate CNC mills and lathes.
  5. Program, run, edit and troubleshoot NC codes.
  6. Perform various methods to create solids, and apply toolpaths.
  7. Work effectively in a manufacturing environment.
  8. Participate and contribute to the effectiveness of teams.
  9. Use basic communication skills (writing, reading, speaking, listening and computing) to meet the needs of the workplace.
  10. Gather, interpret, and use data consistently and accurately to make decisions and take action.
  11. Contribute to the maintenance of a safe and healthy work environment.
  12. Apply technology to operate and contribute to business and manufacturing systems.
  13. Take responsibility for his/her actions and decisions, adapt to change, and update his/her skills, knowledge, and attitudes to meet new challenges.

Renton Technical College

Basic Machining - Renton, WA
Certificate of Completion / 81 Credits
Heather Winfrey - 425-235-7863 - hwinfrey@rtc.edu
Ending: 08/12/14 (Anticipated Graduates = 10)

Program Description

This program prepares students to be manual machinists. Students learn to use conventional lathes and milling machines, as well as grinders and other equipment commonly found in manufacturing facilities. Students learn manufacturing theory and practical skills, as well as blueprint reading, math, communications and human relations. The program lab includes many brands of machining equipment, so students will become comfortable using a variety of controls and displays.

Program Skill Sets

Graduates of the Basic Machining program will:

1. Be able to apply mathematical principles, precision measurement, and blueprint reading in order to machine something according to specifications.
2. Be able to work effectively and professionally in a multicultural workplace.
3. Be able to check and troubleshoot the proper and best tool for optimal performance and efficiency.
4. Be able to obtain and advance in a job as a machinist in a variety of industrial settings.

Renton Technical College

Precision Machining Technologies - Renton, WA
Certificate / 144 Credits
Heather Winfrey - 425-235-7863 - hwinfrey@rtc.edu
Ending: 08/08/14 (Anticipated Graduates = 20)

Program Description

This two-year program is designed to help students acquire and develop skills necessary to work in the manufacturing industry. The course integrates theory and practical applications in a fully equipped machine shop facility. Students study machining processes and procedures, properties of metals, blueprint reading, applied math, inspection techniques, Computer Aided Manufacturing utilizing MasterCAM software, and the operation of Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machines. The CNC equipment includes Vertical and Horizontal Machining Centers as well as CNC Lathes with live tooling. When appropriate, students may be assigned to a cooperative workstation in industry. To earn an Associate of Applied Science Degree, the student must complete all requirements for the certificate program plus 20 credits of General Education.

Program Skill Sets

Graduates of the Precision Machining Technologies program will:

1. Be able to demonstrate the proper use of machine tools such as lathes, mills, and CNC machines.
2. Earn a valid CPR/First Aid card and be aware of industry safety standards.
3. Be able to work in a teamwork environment and be able to communicate effectively in a multicultural workplace.
4. Have the ability to check and troubleshoot the proper and best tool for optimal performance and efficiency.
5. Complete a resume and have the ability to present himself or herself during a job interview.
6. Demonstrate professional appearance/demeanor.

Shoreline Community College

Basic Manufacturing (105) - Shoreline, WA
Short Term Certificate / 21 Credits
Michelene Felker - 206-546-5845 - mfelker@shoreline.edu
Ending: 09/04/14, 12/16/14, 03/25/15, 06/17/15, 09/04/15 (Anticipated Graduates = 10)

Program Description

This 11-week course serves as an introduction to manufacturing. Content includes a survey of mechanical concepts, precision measurement, blueprint reading, quality assurance, workforce skills/communication, ergonomics, and an introduction to lean manufacturing.

Program Skill Sets

At completion of course, student will successfully:
1. Demonstrate knowledge of composites, machining, and software terminology.
2. Demonstrate introductory knowledge of CAD/CAM Software.
3. Geometry creation.
4. Geometry manipulation.
5. Tool path creation.
6. Tool path application.
7. Program verification methods.
8. Post processing operations.
9. Demonstrate knowledge of WinCNC.
10. Demonstrate knowledge of CNC machine safety.
11. Demonstrate ability to set up and operate CNC router.
12. Demonstrate ability to change tools manually and with automatic tool changer.
13. Demonstrate ability to select tooling for appropriate materials.
14. Identify the requirements and detailed instructions necessary for record keeping for composite part machining.
15. Solve applicable mathematical problems.
16. Document technical abilities in written and verbal reports.

Shoreline Community College

Machinist Technical Certificate of Proficiency - Shoreline, WA
Certificate of Proficiency / 61 Credits
Michelene Felker - 206-546-5845 - mfelker@shoreline.edu
Ending: 09/04/14, 12/16/14, 03/25/15, 06/17/15, 09/04/15 (Anticipated Graduates = 10)

Program Description

This two-year program is designed to help students acquire and develop skills necessary to work in the manufacturing industry. The course integrates theory and practical applications in a fully equipped machine shop facility. Students study machining processes and procedures, properties of metals, blueprint reading, applied math, inspection techniques, Computer Aided Manufacturing utilizing MasterCAM software, and the operation of Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machines. The CNC equipment includes Vertical and Horizontal Machining Centers as well as CNC Lathes with live tooling. When appropriate, students may be assigned to a cooperative workstation in industry. To earn an Associate of Applied Science Degree, the student must complete all requirements for the certificate program plus 20 credits of General Education.

Program Skill Sets

1. Operate a variety of CNC machines.
2. Set up tooling for CNC machining operations.
3. Perform quality control functions to ensure part compliance with required specification.
4. Interpret blueprints. Possess knowledge of their role as an employee and factors that are critical to the company’s success.

Shoreline Community College

Principles of Precision Machining - Shoreline, WA
Short Term Certificate / 40 Credits
Michelene Felker - 206-546-5845 - mfelker@shoreline.edu
Ending: 09/04/14, 12/16/14, 03/25/15, 06/17/15, 09/04/15 (Anticipated Graduates = 10)

Program Description

This course covers conventional machining, basic blueprint reading and math; health and safety; and introduction to CNC machining. The course work is divided between lab assignments, lecture and reading/workbook assignments, with a significant amount of lab time dedicated to conventional mills and lathes. The course also covers advanced blueprint reading skills including understanding of Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerance, applied math skills, simple CNC Machine programming and operation, introduction to Lean manufacturing, and introduction to ISO 9001/AS9100 quality systems.

Program Skill Sets

1. Safely produce a part with in print on a conventional lathe and on a conventional milling machine.
2. Accurately read precision measuring tools within .002”.
3. Read prints to industry’s standards and interpret manufacturing drawings and accurately determine tolerances on a blue print.
4. Visualize 3 dimensional shapes from two dimensional drawings using orthographic projection.
5. Write a basic G-code program to produce a tool path of a given shape.
6. Math used to solve typical machine shop problems using Algebra and Plane Geometry to: Accurately determine the upper and lower limits of dimension tolerances; Work though specific shop math formulas accurately; Visualize geometric shapes; Find specific Cartesian coordinates; solve typical machine shop problems using trigonometry.
7. Set up a CNC machine by: finding and storing in the controller the work absolute zero offsets.
8. Loading tools into the machine’s magazine.
9. Correctly establish tool offsets.
10. Change wear and diameter offsets to adjust part dimensions to meet print specifications.
11. Safely start up the machine and properly shut it down.
12. Make minor program edits at the machine to change speeds or feeds.
13. Determine the processes needed to create precision hole; Hone or lap a hole +/-.0005”; measure a bore diameter using a dial bore gage within .0002”.
14. Write a basic G-code program; Identify and define G-Codes and M-Codes.
15. Write a program that loads a tool and performs a machining operation.
16. Determine thread tolerances.
17. Determine the stack of gage blocks needed to set up a sine bar.
18. Find the distance between holes on a bolt circle involving an odd number of holes.
19. Find the lengths of the sides of a right triangle when only one side and one internal angle is known.
20. Can determine the internal angles of a right triangle when only the sides are known.
21. Basic principles of Lean/Six Sigma manufacturing principles.
22. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts of 5S, Cell Design and Pull Systems.
23. Basic principles the ISO 9001/AS9100 system and how a quality system is used in an organization.

Washington Aerospace Training and Research (WATR) Center

Aerospace Manufacturing Tooling - Everett, WA
Short Term Certificate / 17 Credits
Larry Cluphf - 425-347-8928
Ending: 06/11/14, 07/22/14, 08/29/14, 10/08/14, 11/14/14, 12/23/14 (Anticipated Graduates = 15)

Program Description

Graduates of this program qualify for entry-level positions as Toolmakers. Toolmakers work with machinists, welders and engineers to define, create and validate tools.

Program Skill Sets

The certificate includes 10 modules, giving students skills in these areas:

  1.  Tooling Orientation
  2. Manufacturing Teams
  3. Precision Instruments
  4. Hand Tools
  5. Basic Drilling
  6. Countersinking
  7. Tap and Die
  8. Power Island Equipment
  9. Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T)
  10. Tooling Capstone Project

 

Wenatchee Valley College

Industrial Technology - Machining Certificate - Wenatchee, WA
Certificate / 56 Credits
Zack Jacobson - 509-682-6636 - ZJacobson@wvc.edu
Ending: 06/2015 (Anticipated Graduates = 20)

Program Description

Wenatchee Valley College's Industrial Technology Machining Program is designed to meet the needs of those entering or working in the machining industry.

The machining program will provide students with fundamental machining skills and experiences using current machining technologies and techniques. A graduate of the program will be prepared for entry into the machining industry as a conventional (manual) or CNC (Computer Numerical Control) machinist. Instruction covers conventional turning, milling and grinding, as well as basic programming, set up and operation of CNC machine tools. Other subjects include shop safety, reading engineering drawings, shop mathematics, machine tool theory, as well as lean manufacturing and other skills currently required by the machining/manufacturing industry. In addition, students will be required to complete a job shadowing experience and a program culmination capstone project. 

Students completing the Machining Certificate are qualified for entry-level positions as:

Millwright; Manual Lathe Machinist; Production Machinist; Tool and Die Maker; CAD/Drafting Technician; Entry-level Industrial Mechanic; Quality Control Technician; Machinist Apprentice
 

Program Skill Sets

Upon completion of the WVC Machining certificate, the successful student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a practical and technical math reasoning ability.
  2. Use measuring equipment such as calipers, micrometers and indicators.
  3. Locate and use resources for material identification and tooling/machining characteristics.
  4. Correctly and safely operate a variety of turning and milling and general shop machinery.
  5. Handle, dispose of and/or safely use most hazardous and non-hazardous shop materials.
  6. Read and interpret blueprints and lay out projects.
  7. Navigate through current drafting software; create, save and print files.
  8. Use basic G and M codes for CNC machining.
  9. Demonstrate familiarity with proper employee conduct and workplace communication practices.

Degree Programs for Precision Machining

Bates Technical College

Machinist - Tacoma, WA
ATA / 112 Credits
Lin Zhou - 253-680-7105
Ending: 8/14/14 (Anticipated Graduates = 45)

Program Description

Machinists produce precision parts, tools, and instruments utilizing both manual and computerized fabrication systems. Students prepare for apprenticeship with instruction that includes extensive hands-on experience in the use of traditional precision tooling and machining equipment, as well as sophisticated, state-of-the-art equipment including Haas lathes, the Visual Quick Code Probing System and CG Tech software. This is a pre-apprenticeship program for the Tacoma Machinists Joint Apprenticeship Training Committee. The program also provides extended learning opportunities for persons previously or currently employed in related professions.

Program Skill Sets

At the successful completion of the program curriculum, students will be able to:

  1. Apply safety procedures appropriate to running a modern machine shop.
  2. Interpret Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) used in machining fluids and materials.
  3. Use micrometers, indicators, calipers, height gauges, and etc. to measure and inspect parts accurately.
  4. Solve practical trigonometry problems related to the geometry of parts.
  5. Read and interpret engineering drawings as they apply to machined parts
  6. Use geometric dimensioning and tolerancing symbols as applied to Engineering drawings
  7. Identify and use appropriate tool materials for a given application.
  8. Apply speeds and feeds for various cutting tools and materials.
  9. Set up and operate a variety of manual lathes, milling machines, and precision grinding machines to produce parts to specifications.
  10. Use common CNC machine language to write programs for CNC lathes and mills.
  11. Set up and operate a variety of CNC lathes and milling machines using 2,3 and 4 axis movements to produce parts to specifications.
  12. Use CAD/CAM software to generate geometry and tool path.
  13. Produce a capstone project to include the above skill sets. 

In addition, the following college-wide learning outcomes reflect the guiding expectations of all programs at Bates Technical College:

  • Human Diversity
  • Effective Communication
  • Critical-thinking


 

Bellingham Technical College

Precision Machining AAS - Bellingham, WA
AAS / 129 Credits
Tim Martinson or Evan Walker - 360-752-8406, 360-752-8787 - TMartinson@btc.ctc.edu or EWalker@btc.ctc.edu
Ending: 06/24/14 (Anticipated Graduates = 10)

Program Description

The Precision Machining Program provides students with employment skills in the Computerized Machining Industry. The degree includes CAD/ CAM, theory, and related academic skills for continued success in the machine trades. Students learn how to use machine tools such as lathes, drill presses, and milling machines, plus blueprint reading, basic CNC programming and machine processes.

Graduates from the Precision Machining program may work with aircraft, boat, and automobile manufacturers, industrial machinery firms, and machine shops.

With this foundation experience, graduates can advance to positions such as journey level machinist, tool programmer, CNC operator/programmer or engineer.  

Program Skill Sets

All Program completers will:
1. Demonstrate competency in their ability to operate machine shop equipment: lathes, mills, grinders, and drills.
2. Demonstrate competency in their ability to read and interpret blueprints per industry standards.
3. Successfully demonstrate their ability to process and plan a piece part through the lab until completion.
4. Demonstrate competency in CNC machine tool operation and programming.
5. Demonstrate competency in CAM design and manufacturing.

Bellingham Technical College

Precision Machining AAS-T - Bellingham, WA
AAS-T / 134 Credits
Tim Martinson or Evan Walker - 360-752-8406, 360-752-8787 - TMartinson@btc.ctc.edu or EWalker@btc.ctc.edu .edu
Ending: 06/24/14 (Anticipated Graduates = 10)

Program Description

The Precision Machining Program provides students with employment skills in the Computerized Machining Industry. The degree includes CAD/ CAM, theory, and related academic skills for continued success in the machine trades. Students learn how to use machine tools such as lathes, drill presses, and milling machines, plus blueprint reading, basic CNC programming and machine processes.

Graduates from the Precision Machining program may work with aircraft, boat, and automobile manufacturers, industrial machinery firms, and machine shops.

With this foundation experience, graduates can advance to positions such as journey level machinist, tool programmer, CNC operator/programmer or engineer.

Program Skill Sets

All Program completers will:
1. Demonstrate competency in their ability to operate machine shop equipment: lathes, mills, grinders, and drills.
2. Demonstrate competency in their ability to read and interpret blueprints per industry standards.
3. Successfully demonstrate their ability to process and plan a piece part through the lab until completion.
4. Demonstrate competency in CNC machine tool operation and programming.
5. Demonstrate competency in CAM design and manufacturing.

Clark College

Machining Technologies AAS - Vancouver, WA
AAS / 122 Credits
Bruce Wells - 360-992-2548 - bwells@clark.edu
Ending: 12/05/14, 03/13/15, 06/12/15 (Anticipated Graduates = 6)

Program Description

Clark College's Machining Technology program offers instruction in numerous machine processes including the set-up and operation of the engine lathe, surface grinders, vertical mill, CNC lathes, EDM and CNC milling machines. All shop theory subjects have a direct bearing on the student's skill, safety, and attitude. In addition to shop theory and practice, the student studies math, blueprint reading, metallurgy, safety, and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) programming. MasterCAM programming classes teach basic CAM programming for mills, lathe, EDM, etc. The basic CNC class involves writing programs and learning to safely operate the HAAS CNC mills.

Program Skill Sets

  1. Demonstrate compliance of all machine shop safety regulations.
  2. Interpret blueprints and perform inspection of machined parts.
  3. Perform entry-level skills for setup and operation of manual machines.
  4. Perform entry-level skills to program, operate, and set up CNC machine tools.
  5. Communicate and interact in a team/group environment to perform multiple tasks in a professional and ethical manner.

Clark College

Machining Technologies AAT - Vancouver, WA
AAT / 118 Credits
Bruce Wells - 360-992-2548 - bwells@clark.edu
Ending: 06/19/14, 12/05/14, 03/13/15, 06/12/15 (Anticipated Graduates = 6)

Program Description

Clark College's Machining Technology program offers instruction in numerous machine processes including the set-up and operation of the engine lathe, surface grinders, vertical mill, CNC lathes, EDM and CNC milling machines. All shop theory subjects have a direct bearing on the student's skill, safety, and attitude. In addition to shop theory and practice, the student studies math, blueprint reading, metallurgy, safety, and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) programming. MasterCAM programming classes teach basic CAM programming for mills, lathe, EDM, etc. The basic CNC class involves writing programs and learning to safely operate the HAAS CNC mills.

Program Skill Sets

  1. Demonstrate compliance of all machine shop safety regulations.
  2. Interpret blueprints and perform inspection of machined parts.
  3. Perform entry-level skills for setup and operation of manual machines.
  4. Perform entry-level skills to program, operate, and set up CNC machine tools.
  5. Communicate and interact in a team/group environment to perform multiple tasks in a professional and ethical manner.

Everett Community College

Precision Machining- Advanced Manufacturing Technology - Everett, WA
ATA / 90 Credits
Annette Floyd - 425-388-9562 - afloyd@everettcc.edu
Ending: 8/22/14, 12/13/14, 03/20/15, 06/13/15 (Anticipated Graduates = 16)

Program Description

In addition to the specifics of the Principles of Precision Machining Certificate listed above, the ATA degree covers computer literacy, industrial safety, engineering graphics 2D Auto CAD, technical problem analysis, precision fits and tolerances, Solid Works, pneumatic, hydraulic and electrical circuits, materials and processes and operations management.

Program Skill Sets

In addition to the specific skills of the Principles of Precision Machining Certificate listed above, the program outcomes include:

1. Solve technical mathematical problems.
2. Read and understand basic engineering drawings.
3. Understand and utilize machine technology.
4. Write programs and setup CNC machines.
5. Operate and perform maintenance on CNC machines.
6. Document technical activities in written and verbal reports.
7. Be prepared for successful employment.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology

Machine Technology AAS - Kirkland, WA
AAS / 114 Credits
Mike Clifton - 425-739-8357 - mike.clifton@lwtech.edu
Ending: 8/23/14, 12/04/14, 03/18/15, 06/17/15 (Anticipated Graduates = 24)

Program Description

Program Mission: The Machine Technology AAS degree prepares students to be well positioned to begin a career in the machine trades by gaining basic machining competencies.

Program Skill Sets

Machine Technology AAS degree graduates will:

1. Be prepared with skills to perform entry-level CNC machining and manual machining.

2. Gain a thorough grounding in shop theory and applied math; perform CAD/CAM programming and manual programming.

3. Combine manual and CNC skills to produce a capstone project of complex parts.

4. Demonstrate math and communication skills; set up and operate machine tools with a minimum of supervision.

5. Demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, intercultural appreciation, information and technical literacy, and communication.

6. Meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes.

Renton Technical College

Precision Machining Technologies AAS - Renton, WA
AAS / 164 Credits
Heather Winfrey - 425-235-7863 - hwinfrey@rtc.edu
Ending: 08/12/14, 08/2015 (Anticipated Graduates = 15)

Program Description

This two-year program is designed to help students acquire and develop skills necessary to work in the manufacturing industry. The course integrates theory and practical applications in a fully equipped machine shop facility. Students study machining processes and procedures, properties of metals, blueprint reading, applied math, inspection techniques, Computer Aided Manufacturing utilizing MasterCAM software, and the operation of Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machines. The CNC equipment includes Vertical and Horizontal Machining Centers as well as CNC Lathes with live tooling. When appropriate, students may be assigned to a cooperative workstation in industry. To earn an Associate of Applied Science Degree, the student must complete all requirements for the certificate program plus 20 credits of General Education.

Program Skill Sets

Graduates of the Precision Machining Technologies program will:

1. Be able to demonstrate the proper use of machine tools such as lathes, mills, and CNC machines.
2. Earn a valid CPR/First Aid card and be aware of industry safety standards.
3. Be able to work in a teamwork environment and be able to communicate effectively in a multicultural workplace.
4. Have the ability to check and troubleshoot the proper and best tool for optimal performance and efficiency.
5. Complete a resume and have the ability to present himself or herself during a job interview.
6. Demonstrate professional appearance/demeanor.

Shoreline Community College

Machining Technology AAS - Shoreline, WA
AAS / 105 Credits
Michelene Felker - 206-546-5845 - mfelker@shoreline.edu
Ending: 09/04/14, 12/16/14, 03/25/15, 06/17/15, 09/04/15 (Anticipated Graduates = 10)

Program Description

This program prepares students for employment in the machinist/manufacturing field. Using a variety of machine tools including computer numeric control (CNC) equipment, students learn to make metal parts to precise specifications. Knowledge of the working properties of metal, capabilities of machine tools and equipment, and standard shop practices prepare students for employment in all types of factories, industries, and maintenance shops.

Program Skill Sets

Machine Technology AAS degree graduates will:
1. Be prepared with skills to perform entry-level CNC machining and manual machining.
2. Gain a thorough grounding in shop theory and applied math; perform CAD/CAM programming and manual programming.
3. Combine manual and CNC skills to produce a capstone project of complex parts.
4. Demonstrate math and communication skills; set up and operate machine tools with a minimum of supervision.
5. Demonstrate critical thinking, teamwork, intercultural appreciation, information and technical literacy, and communication.
6. Meet Social Science, Humanities, Written Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning distribution area outcomes.

South Puget Sound Community College

Computer Aided Drafting/Building Information Modeling - Olympia, WA
AAS / 90 Credits
Mike Murphy - 360-596-5253 - mmurphy@spscc.edu
Ending: 08/20/14, 12/12/14, 03/27/15 (Anticipated Graduates = 6)

Program Description

The Computer Aided Drafting Technology (CAD) Associate in Applied Science Program is designed to meet entry-level employment requirements in Computer Aided Drafting occupations and provide students with a broad range of employment opportunities in Architectural, Civil, Mechanical and Building Information Modeling technologies. In addition, students may elect a specific area of concentration to meet their personal goals or occupational requirements.

Program Skill Sets

Demonstrate the following skills standards specific to CAD Technologies:

1. Produce a personal portfolio of industry standard documents utilizing a variety of computer drafting applications.
2. Develop complete plans to meet the needs of the (AEC) Architecture, Engineering and Construction industries.
3. Create 3-D Building Models including management of embedded and extracted data.
4. Develop profiles and cross sections, land sub divisions, site and grading plans and basic earthwork calculations with accurate and correct interpretation of survey data gathered utilizing survey instrumentation.
5. Model mechanical design concepts in 3D utilizing the industry recognized solid modeling software.
6. Communicate effectively.
7. Think logically and critically.
8. Evaluate and process quantitative and symbolic data.
9. Understand themselves in relation to others in a multicultural world.
10. Understand ethical responsibilities and consequences.

Wenatchee Valley College

Industrial Technology - Machining ATS Degree - Wenatchee, WA
ATS / 104 Credits
Zack Jacobson - 682-6636 - ZJacobson@wvc.edu
Ending: 06/2016 (Anticipated Graduates = 20)

Program Description

Wenatchee Valley College's Industrial Technology Machining Program is designed to meet the needs of those entering or working in the machining industry.

The machining program will provide students with fundamental machining skills and experiences using current machining technologies and techniques. A graduate of the program will be prepared for entry into the machining industry as a conventional (manual) or CNC (Computer Numerical Control) machinist. Instruction covers conventional turning, milling and grinding, as well as basic programming, set up and operation of CNC machine tools. Other subjects include shop safety, reading engineering drawings, shop mathematics, machine tool theory, as well as lean manufacturing and other skills currently required by the machining/manufacturing industry. In addition, students will be required to complete a job shadowing experience and a program culmination capstone project.  

The Industrial Technology-Machining ATS Degree prepares students for employment as:

CNC Operator; CNC Programmer; Set-Up Machinist; Precision Machinist: Manufacturing Technician: Fluid Power Mechanic; Industrial Mechanic; Quality Control Supervisor; Production Supervisor
 

Program Skill Sets

Upon completion of the WVC Machining ATS Degree, the successful student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a practical and technical math reasoning ability.
  2. Use measuring equipment such as calipers, micrometers and indicators.
  3. Locate and use resources for material identification and tooling/machining characteristics.
  4. Correctly and safely operate a variety of turning and milling and general shop machinery.
  5. Handle, dispose of and/or safely use most hazardous and non-hazardous shop materials.
  6. Read and interpret blueprints and lay out projects.
  7. Navigate through current drafting software; create, save and print files.
  8. Use basic G and M codes for CNC machining.
  9. Demonstrate familiarity with proper employee conduct and workplace communication practices.
  10. Operate a variety of CNC machines
  11. Set up tooling for CNC machining operations
  12. Complete moderately complex projects for manual and CNC machines.
  13. Demonstrate basic welding operations.
  14. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of electrical controls.
  15. Troubleshoot and repair basic hydraulic and pneumatic systems.

More about the COE's Recent Graduates Tool

Washington's 34 community and technical colleges produce thousands of graduates per year. This tool allows those in aerospace and advanced manufacturing to search for graduates within a category (skills or job type), school or location. This shows employers how many skilled labor positions they can hire within certain skill sets. 

When reviewing a college entry for a program, you may view: 

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