Brief Intro

PATAM2 will significantly expand and sustain apprenticeship in the United States in the advanced manufacturing and maritime sectors. These two linked sectors:

  • Share trouble recruiting workers;
  • Face unprecedented labor-market, competitive, and regulatory shifts that threaten productivity and demand for future labor;
  • And, significantly contribute to economic prosperity in Washington (WA) with 181,000 jobs and over $16 billion in economic activity.

 

 

Click to View: Boeing Internship Program

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Partnership for Advanced Technology Apprenticeships in Manufacturing and Marine Engineering:
An American Apprenticeship Initiative (AAI) grant funded through the Department of Labor

Project Goals:

While this partnership will serve at least 1,000 apprentices in Washington (WA) in the advanced manufacturing and maritime sectors, more importantly, it will create infrastructure to significantly scale and sustain apprenticeships into the future by focusing on both ends of the apprenticeship pipeline: improving pathways into apprenticeship; and expanding and improving its employer base.

We currently have 200 registered apprentices in existing programs including Marine Paint, Heat/Frost Insulators, Maritime Deck, Boilermakers, AJAC manufacturing programs, Puget Sound Electrical and a few others.

Objectives:

  1. Create three new apprenticeship programs, including first-in-the-nation programs in maritime engineering and certified safety specialist, as well as a new program in CNC programming
  2. Improve pathways into apprenticeship by:
    • Developing common competencies for advanced manufacturing pre-apprenticeships and pre-employment programs;
    • Implementing a new pre-apprenticeship in maritime and another in fundamental skills in engineering and manufacturing where feeders to apprenticeship are lacking;
    • Creating an apprenticeship navigator system to help people successfully navigate the continuum of apprentice experiences.
  3. Improve and expand the employer base by:
    • Piloting and demonstrating the effectiveness of on-the-job training consultants;
    • Creating an employer intermediary system through contracts with organizations such as local Workforce Development Councils;
    • Piloting a new Red Book of advanced manufacturing standards that will create portability for workers moving between companies while reducing company costs by eliminating the need to re-certify workers.
  4. Recruit at least 300 participants from underrepresented populations by:
    • Partnering with community-based organizations to enhance recruitment of Veterans, women, youth, minorities, and disabled workers.

Partnership Activities:

South Seattle College

As the grant recipient, South Seattle is the primary administrator of the American Apprenticeship Initiative.

  • Completed contracts with each of the subrecipients identified below.
  • Conducted a DACUM training for several subrecipients and worked with employers to develop job profile charts for two new programs, Certified Safety Specialist Apprenticeship and Maritime Pre-Apprenticeship.
  • Prepare quarterly narrative and financial reports for the Department of Labor.
  • Host quarterly committee meetings with subrecipients including pre-apprenticeship, employer engagement and steering.
  • Participate on several committees with Labor & Industries Systems Integration Team, including Policy, Pre-Apprenticeship and Employer Engagement.

Aerospace Joint Apprenticeship Committee (AJAC)

  • Conducted a DACUM with employers in January to begin to develop the curriculum and identify work processes for a new apprenticeship in CNC Programming. They plan to launch the apprenticeship in 2018.
  • Meeting with the three county WDC’s to explore the use of WIOA OJT funds as incentives for employers to bring on a new 18-month Industrial Manufacturing Technician apprenticeship they are developing.
  • On the Job Training Advisor is taking an active role in OJT support services. She is currently finishing a comprehensive needs assessment with current AJAC employers; she is responding to OJT issues throughout the state as problems or questions arise and she is facilitating a Mentor training through the Mentor Matters program and will be conducting training with mentors and first line supervisors starting in the spring 2017.
  • Received approval from the WSATC for a new Production Technician (Youth) apprenticeship program that is being piloted at a Tacoma High School.

Apprenticeship and Nontraditional Employment for Women (ANEW)

  • Provided close to $20,000 of supportive service funding for new apprentices in multiple apprenticeship programs to help them transition into their apprenticeship.
  • Funding provided for transportation, housing, tools, clothes, dues, tuition, etc.
    Center of Excellence for Aerospace & Advanced Manufacturing (COE)
  • Over time, colleges and community partners, such as AJAC, have partnered in various ways to create pre-apprenticeship/pre-employment programs with a focus on manufacturing. Aside from AJAC’s Manufacturing Academy, few of the pre-employment programs offered throughout the community and technical colleges have withstood the test of time and/or sustained the interest in the communities they were established to serve. Our consultant has reached across the state to find programs, that while very different, offer excellent examples of pre-apprenticeship/pre-employment programs that seek to connect the interests of the employer and the surrounding community. Please see the attached reports regarding these programs.
  • Findings indicate that for either type of program to be both relevant and viable, several conditions should exist. In addition, new technologies are raising the skill level required to support and sustain these new technologies.
    Actively engage local businesses. Each of the pre-employment programs featured in this report are directly connected to a sponsoring employer. This employer connection is essential to sustaining their success.
  • Rely on labor market data to drive decisions Before a program is created and offered, it should rely on indicators that affirm its need and will fulfill its promise.
  • Require that participants treat the training like a job Employers continually report that it’s easier for entry-level participants to master the technical content of a position than it is to routinely display the soft skills required of a working professional trades person.
  • Connect people to a career opportunity Any program labeled “PRE” implies that successful completion, should lead to success in achieving the promise of the program—an entry-level position in a field related to the program of study.
    Provide wrap-around student services In many cases the students enrolled in such programs encounter obstacles that may impact their participation. Having a support system in place (mentors, coaches, advisors, etc.) can help to facilitate student success.
  • Tap innovative funding sources The payoff for these programs is in the actual success students enjoy upon completion and placement in a profession. They are typically short-term and generate little revenue to supporting intuition in and of themselves. It requires a long-term commitment on the part of the entire community for them to succeed.
  • Embrace evaluation Data on program completion and placement must be routinely collected and assessed to determine program relevance and achievements.
  • A survey was also distributed to AJAC’s employer base to determine primary challenges with entry-level workers. 74% reported that either their entry-level workers are not prepared at all, or while they have some preparation, new hires are lacking certain skills including attendance, communication, work ethic, attention to detail and other skills like blueprint reading, safety, common tools, basic mechanical skills and precision measurement skills.
  • The plan this quarter is for the COE to bring together educational representatives from advanced manufacturing pre-employment and AJAC’s manufacturing academy to share the gap analysis of program coverage, curriculum, etc. and the key conditions for success. They will work with them to determine if there is interest to address these findings, and how that might be done in curriculum design, adding internships/work experience into the programs, etc.

Center of Excellence for Aerospace & Advanced Manufacturing (COE)

Over time, colleges and community partners, such as AJAC, have partnered in various ways to create pre-apprenticeship/pre-employment programs with a focus on manufacturing. Aside from AJAC’s Manufacturing Academy, few of the pre-employment programs offered throughout the community and technical colleges have withstood the test of time and/or sustained the interest in the communities they were established to serve. Our consultant has reached across the state to find programs, that while very different, offer excellent examples of pre-apprenticeship/pre-employment programs that seek to connect the interests of the employer and the surrounding community.

Please see the reports regarding these programs in the left column.

Findings indicate that for either type of program to be both relevant and viable, several conditions should exist. In addition, new technologies are raising the skill level required to support and sustain these new technologies.

Actively engage local businesses

Each of the pre-employment programs featured in this report are directly connected to a sponsoring employer. This employer connection is essential to sustaining their success.

Rely on labor market data to drive decisions

Before a program is created and offered, it should rely on indicators that affirm its need and will fulfill its promise.

Require that participants treat the training like a job

Employers continually report that it’s easier for entry-level participants to master the technical content of a position than it is to routinely display the soft skills required of a working professional trades person.

Connect people to a career opportunity

Any program labeled “PRE” implies that successful completion, should lead to success in achieving the promise of the program—an entry-level position in a field related to the program of study.

Provide wrap-around student services

In many cases the students enrolled in such programs encounter obstacles that may impact their participation. Having a support system in place (mentors, coaches, advisors, etc.) can help to facilitate student success.

Tap innovative funding sources

The payoff for these programs is in the actual success students enjoy upon completion and placement in a profession. They are typically short-term and generate little revenue to supporting intuition in and of themselves. It requires a long-term commitment on the part of the entire community for them to succeed.

Embrace evaluation

Data on program completion and placement must be routinely collected and assessed to determine program relevance and achievements.

  • A survey was also distributed to AJAC’s employer base to determine primary challenges with entry-level workers. 74% reported that either their entry-level workers are not prepared at all, or while they have some preparation, new hires are lacking certain skills including attendance, communication, work ethic, attention to detail and other skills like blueprint reading, safety, common tools, basic mechanical skills and precision measurement skills.
  • The plan this quarter is for the COE to bring together educational representatives from advanced manufacturing pre-employment and AJAC’s manufacturing academy to share the gap analysis of program coverage, curriculum, etc. and the key conditions for success. They will work with them to determine if there is interest to address these findings, and how that might be done in curriculum design, adding internships/work experience into the programs, etc.

Clover Park Technical College

Finalizing the curriculum adaptations that were necessary to transition their Fundamental Skills in Manufacturing and Engineering certificate into a WSATC recognized pre-apprenticeship program. They plan to implement the pre-apprenticeship fall 2017. They are conducting focused outreach to transitioning service members.

Edmonds Community College

In partnership with Intuitive Safety Solutions received provisional registration from the WSATC for the Certified Safety Specialist Apprenticeship Program in January. The program will begin fall 2017.

Renton Technical College

The King County apprenticeship navigator works out of RTC and has been conducting outreach and recruitment for pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship programs through the WorkSource system, public libraries, high schools, skills centers, veteran’s transition events, etc. with a focus on serving underrepresented populations.

  • Assist clients with finding and applying to programs, resume and interview prep, career guidance, and access to funding for tools, dues, transportation, childcare, etc.
  • Coordinate employer outreach efforts with the business services team as well as with the L&I Apprenticeship Consultants.
  • The Heat/Frost Insulators program is receiving $50,000 for new band saws, lab equipment and a laptop lab to train apprentices using more current technology.

Seattle Central College/Seattle Maritime Academy

Completed a contract with a private maritime training company, MITAGS-PMI to develop the curriculum for this new apprenticeship. They plan to launch the apprenticeship in 2018.

Pursuing an MOU with Seattle Public Schools Skill Centers to create a maritime skills center program hosted at the Seattle Maritime Academy. They are hoping to collaborate with the Seattle Public Schools Skills Centers to have this program recognized as a Maritime pre-apprenticeship program.

Seattle-King County, Pierce County, and Snohomish County Workforce Development Councils

The SKC WDC has been working to increase the relationship between the business services team (BST) and the Navigators in Snohomish and Pierce Counties and Renton Technical College. To assist in facilitating the BST’s ability to align employers interested in apprenticeship programs, the BST has begun surveying employers for this interest and recording it in B2B (CRM tool). Reports will be developed that will make identification of these businesses easy and accessible. The WDC has continued its efforts of communicating with partners and the community about apprenticeship, and specifically, the activities going on with the AAI grant. The WDC opportunities at WDC Board and committee meetings; discussing apprenticeship opportunities, policy and access with state organizations; and always being sure to highlight apprenticeship work and possibilities when relaying opportunities to partner organizations.

  • The Pierce and Snohomish County Navigators are also conducting outreach and recruitment for pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship programs through the WorkSource system, public libraries, high schools, skills centers, veteran’s transition events, etc. with a focus on serving underrepresented populations.
  • The Navigators also assist clients with finding and applying to programs, resume and interview prep, career guidance, and access to funding for tools, dues, transportation, childcare, etc.
  • Each of the Navigators is coordinating employer outreach efforts with business services teams at the WDC’s as well as with the L&I Apprenticeship Consultants